Fortune.com got the scoop that freemium mobile developer FreedomPop would be allaying any thoughts of selling the company. CEO Stephen Stokols, leader of the LA based startup company, said that it would be ‘premature to sell’ at the moment. Stokols went on to say that the company has big goals for the future, including an 18 month plan that would turn FreedomPop into a billion dollar business. Along the way the company will need some help and it looks like they are already starting to see some action.

In the Series B round we saw Partech Ventures lead a group of investors toward FreedomPop. ALong with DCM Capital and Mangrove CApital, an additional $30 million dollars in funding have made it to FreedomPops account. Along with contributions from Atomico (seeded by Skype founded Niklas Zennstom) the team at FreedomPop is looking at almost $50 million raised in the past three years. This number is nicely sized but pales in comparison to their goal outreach.

FreedomPop is turning the corner on 1 million total subscribers to their network and with this mark looming the team has decided to push things into overdrive. Stephen Stokols knows that the company still has a lot to improve on, expounding on the fact that their customer service has been subpar, but he knows the proper goals when he sees them. Right now Stokols is aiming to get FreedomPop into the stores of big chain retail providers, like Wal Mart and Best Buy. Such a move could bring FreedomPop dangerously close to their billion dollar goal.

FreedomPop is a freemium mobile provider that gives customers a free allotted amount of data, talk, and text. The company makes its money by upselling other services. While not completely new, this freemium market is currently booming right now.

Source – http://fortune.com/2015/06/17/freedompop/

Marriott International recently got itself into some high-tech trouble for preventing its guests from using their Wi-Fi units.

The trouble arose at the Gaylord Opryland Resort and Convention Center, which is located in Nashville, Tenn., and is managed by Marriott. Accomplished with jamming equipment, the interference with Wi-Fi service was imposed on organizers and exhibitors of a conference that was taking place in a ballroom, but not on regular guests.
This action forced those who had not purchased rooms to pay between $250 and $1,000 to use the hotel’s Internet connection. Hotel guests like Khaled Shaheen often use Wi-Fi hotspots to connect to the Net through cellphones to avoid these costs.
In addition to changing its own policy, Marriott asked the FCC to change its rules to eliminate confusion that may exist on the issue of Net access in hotels.

According to the virtual grapevine, when Microsoft unleashes its next version of Windows it will once again drastically change the function of the Windows Start screen. The latest version could dispense with the menu that fills the screen and replace it with the classic bottom left corner menu, a direct response to a vocal majority extremely unhappy with the full screen menu.

Nothing has been finalized but returning to a more traditional Start pop-up is only the, well, start. The latest version is not going to be simply a return to Windows 7. Folder shortcuts could move to the top, switching placing with pinned apps. This will allow users to pin tiles on the right side, with the option to resize and reorder. Meanwhile, the full screen Start menu may still be available by changing properties.

The latest Windows – which could end up being called Threshold or simply Windows – also continues the software manufacturer’s desire to have a single platform running across all devices.

The biggest and most interesting tidbit is the latest version may be more than an upgrade, but a solution that would have a lifespan of free updates. It may even be free for Windows 8 users.