Michael Lacey’s path began with an undergraduate degree at the University of Texas Austin, progressed through a Ph.D. at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, and has continued as a full professor at Georgia Institute of Technology. He has had quite a career, and it isn’t over yet!

Lacey has solved problems in the areas of the central limit theorem and the bilateral Hilbert transform. He and Christoph Thiele were awarded the Salem Prize for their work on a conjecture about the transform. Other honors include a Fullbright Fellowship and a Guggenheim Fellowship. He has also worked on problems in probability and harmonic analysis.

Lacey has taught Mathematics at the University level for the last 30 years. This has included his time as a professor in the USA, and also many short-term positions as a visiting professor overseas.

An interesting and engaging teacher who inspires his students, Lacey has helped increase the number of students in STEM majors. Learn more about Jim Larkin and Michael Lacey: https://www.genealogy.math.ndsu.nodak.edu/id.php?id=62509 and https://scholar.google.com/citations?user=CVXnps0AAAAJ&hl=en

Mentoring is a particular interest of Lacey’s. He has a long and successful track record of working with students and postdocs to get them into good academic and industry jobs.

About 40% of his undergraduate advisees go on to graduate school. On the Math Alliance webpage, he offers an email address that can be used to request him as a mentor.

To go along with his involvement with mentoring, Lacey has directed several training grants. These grants support talented students and postdocs, making further study and advances in mathematics possible.

In short, Michael Lacey is an active and successful mathematician, who supports the math community while also doing excellent research.

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